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Number of pubs in the South East has dropped 19% since 2005

Number of pubs in the South East has dropped 19% since 2005

The number of pubs in the South East has declined by almost a fifth since 2005.

Nationwide, 1,829 pubs have closed, with almost 350 shutting their doors during the pandemic.

A report from the Drinks Industry Group of Ireland shows there was a decline in every county in Ireland.

The analysis shows 21.2% of pubs closed Nationwide between 2005 and 2021, with that figure standing at 19.1% across the South East.

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Decrease in pubs in every county in Ireland, while 4.9% (349) of pubs closed throughout the pandemic period 2019 - 2021.

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Laois is the most affected reporting a 30.6% decline, while Meath suffered the least, with a decline of just 1.4%.

23 counties had decreases in the number of pubs of greater than 10%.

DIGI is calling on the Government to ease the cost burden on rural drinks businesses to ensure their sustainability by reducing Irelandโ€™s high alcohol excise tax over the next two years.

All 26 counties experienced declines in pub numbers through the 16-year period.

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In the region, the data per county is as follows:

  • Tipperary - 26.3%
  • Waterford - 23.5%
  • Kilkenny- 18.1%
  • Wexford - 17.2%
  • Carlow - 10.4%

Commenting today, Kathryn Dโ€™Arcy, recently appointed Chair of DIGI and Communications and Corporate Affairs Director at Irish Distillers said:

โ€œThe Irish pub has been in a steady decline for years, and these stark figures once again highlight the need to secure the sustainable future of our pubs.

"Central to this is introducing policy measures which can make both an immediate difference and a long-term impact in terms of delivering sustainable policy to support these businesses.

She continued: "DIGI is seeking a reduction in Irelandโ€™s high excise tax rate which would deliver on this.โ€

DIGI is calling on Government to ease the cost burden on rural drinks businesses to ensure their sustainability by reducing Irelandโ€™s high alcohol excise tax over the next two years.

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