Entertainment

Movie Review: The Nice Guys

Movie Review: The Nice Guys

By Colm McCall

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQR5zsLHbYw

Hallelujah! A film which has partially restored my faith in 2016 Hollywood and the entire comedy genre, has hit theatres! Who is this cinematic saviour who has somewhat resurrected this jaded film goer’s enthusiasm for the modern day silver screen? Why none other than Lethal Weapon (1987) writer Shane Black. Despite not being a major fan of the aforementioned cult classic, I am fully aware of Black’s capabilities when it comes to penning a multilayered script.

Sharing many similarities to his earlier picture Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005), The Nice Guys pairs together Ryan Gosling (The Notebook 2004) and Russell Crowe (Gladiator 2000) as two quirky hired hands. They team up in a bid to resolve the mystery of a propaganda pornography movie which has caused a deathly domino effect on those involved in it. Both lead characters have their obvious strengths, however for the most part, their inherent flaws, most notably alcoholism, disguise these positive traits. As quirky and odd as the plot synopsis sounds, it flows with seamless aplomb. The audience are constantly kept on their toes and invested throughout. Through a miscellany of subtle surprise and idiosyncratic humour, Black who is also on directorial duties, guides us with pace and supremacy through a movie maze of sheer fun.

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Despite being cast in an array of quality films such as Blue Valentine (2010) and The Place Beyond the Pines (2012), Ryan Gosling is an actor whose performing merits never appealed to me. More often than not, I feel he is cast for aesthetic purposes and nothing else. But in the case, he shines brighter than the South East sunshine. Easily, this is his best work to date. He has definitely found his niche in dark comedy and power to him. Russell Crowe is on par with Gosling, offering a welcoming element to the dynamic within the contrasting duo. Massive respect also must be shown to newcomer Angourie Rice, who displays potential far beyond her fifteen years. Also, I have to express my refreshment at seeing Kim Basinger (Batman 1989) in another major Hollywood outing. She and Crowe’s presence only heightened the parallels between similar meta-movies such as L.A. Confidential (1997).

Dissimilar to the many forgettable comedies of recent times, this film’s use of wit is quite different to the more prevalent covert gags associated with this genre at present. Strangely enough, I would compare The Nice Guys to Martin McDonagh’s highly acclaimed In Bruges (2008) in that it could smoothly combine an original story with memorable dialogue, slick direction and likeable rounded characters. This is undoubtedly the best film of the year so far.

The Nice Guys scores 9/10 on the MACmeter.

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